London Calendar

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Mary Quant

“The whole point of fashion is to make fashionable clothes available to everyone.” Mary Quant.

From miniskirts and hot pants to vibrant tights and makeup, discover how Mary Quant launched a fashion revolution on the British high street, with over 200 garments and accessories, including unseen pieces from the designer’s personal archive.320

Venue: Victoria & Albert Museum
until 27 Oct 2019

Chihuly at Kew: Reflections on nature

Dale Chihuly, Sapphire Star, 2010 final © Chihuly Studio
Iconic artist Dale Chihuly will once again exhibit his luminous glass artworks in our spectacular landscape, featuring pieces never seen before in the UK.  In the most biodiverse place in the world, you will see the perfect marriage of art, science and nature as Chihuly’s dazzling  sculptures transform our Gardens and glasshouses into a contemporary outdoor gallery space.

 

Venue: Kew Gardens
until 27 Oct 2019

Helene Schjerfbeck

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Helene Schjerfbeck (1862–1946) is a Finnish national icon. From her early naturalistic style – honed during her studies in France – to her highly abstracted self-portraits, this exhibition will present Schjerfbeck for the first time to UK audiences.  Talented and widely travelled, Schjerfbeck found artistic success at a young age. In the 1880s she connected with artists’ colonies in Pont Aven, Brittany and St. Ives, Cornwall

Venue: Royal Academy of Art
until 2 Feb 2020

WILLIAM BLAKE

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With over 300 original works, including his watercolours, paintings and prints, this is the largest show of Blake’s work for almost 20 years. It will rediscover him as a visual artist for the 21st century.

Radical and rebellious, he is an inspiration to visual artists, musicians, poets and performers worldwide. His personal struggles in a period of political terror and oppression, his technical innovation, his vision and political commitment, have perhaps never been more pertinent.  Inside the exhibition will be an immersive recreation of the small domestic room in which Blake showed his art in 1809.  Blake’s dream of showing his works at enormous scale will be made reality using digital technology. His watercolours, paintings and prints, this is the largest show of Blake’s work for almost 20 years. It will rediscover him as a visual artist for the 21st century.

Venue: TATE BRITAIN
until 3 Dec 2019

Anthony Gormley

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From the British coastline to the rooftops of Manhattan, Antony Gormley’s sculptures are recognised across the world. With work from his 45-year career alongside major new installations created for our galleries, we present his most ambitious exhibition in more than ten years.The exhibition will explore Gormley’s wide-ranging use of organic, industrial and elemental materials over the years, including iron, steel, hand-beaten lead, seawater and clay. We will also bring to light rarely-seen early works from the 1970s and 1980s.

 

Venue: Royal Academy of Arts
until 22 Dec 2019

Umberto Boccioni: Recreating the Lost Sculptures

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The destruction, in 1927, of a number of plaster and mixed-media sculptures by the Futurist artist Umberto Boccioni (1882-1916) was a tragic loss for avant-garde art. Of the many ground-breaking sculptures he created between c.1913 and 1915, only a handful remain in existence today. Now, using a combination of vintage photographic material and cutting-edge 3D printing techniques, digital artists Matt Smith and Anders Rådén have recreated four of Boccioni’s destroyed works: a volumetric study of a human face titled Empty and Full Abstracts of a Head, and three of the artist’s iconic striding figures.

Venue: Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art
until 19 Jan 2020

Into the Night Cabarets and Clubs in Modern Art

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The Barbican Art Gallery’s autumn exhibition Into the Night opens in just two weeks, exploring the social and artistic role of cabarets, cafés and clubs in modern art across the world. From New York to Tehran, Paris, Mexico City, London, Berlin, Vienna, Ibadan and beyond, this exhibition shows how creative spaces offered a platform for artistic experimentation and exchange. Discover countless works of art, many rarely seen in the UK, as well as life-size recreations of avant-garde spaces.

Venue: Barbican Art Gallery
until 26 Jan 2020

Inspired by the east – how the Islamic world influenced western art

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This exhibition explores the impact the Islamic world has had on Western art for centuries. Artistic exchange between East and West has a long and intertwined history from the 15th century, following cultural interactions that can still be felt today. Objects from Europe, North America, the Middle East and North Africa highlight a centuries-old tradition of influence and exchange from East to West. The diverse selection of ceramics, photography, glass, jewellery,  clothing and contemporary art reveals how artistic exchange influenced a variety of visual and decorative arts. The show takes a deeper look at the art movement of ‘Orientalism’ – specifically the way in which North Africa and the Middle East were represented as lands of beauty and intrigue, especially in European and North American art.

Venue: British Museum

Starting in October 2019

17 Oct -26 Jan

Pre-Raphaelite Sisters

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This major exhibition is the first-ever to focus on the untold story of the women of Pre-Raphaelite art. 160 years after the first pictures were exhibited by the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood in 1849, Pre-Raphaelite Sisters, explores the overlooked contribution of twelve women to the Pre-Raphaelite movement, including Evelyn de Morgan, Effie Millais (nee Gray), Elizabeth Siddal and Joanna Wells (nee Boyce), an artist whose work has been largely omitted from the history of the movement.

Venue: National Portrait Gallery
27 Oct -26 Jan

Lucian Freud: The Self-portraits

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Spanning nearly seven decades, his self-portraits give a fascinating insight into both his psyche and his development as a painter – from his earliest portrait, painted in 1939, to his final one executed 64 years later. They trace the fascinating evolution from the linear graphic works of his early career to the fleshier, painterly style he became synonymous with.

Venue: Royal Academy of Art

Starting in November 2019

21 Nov -8 Mar

Troy myth and reality

The legend of Troy has endured for more than 3,000 years. The story of a great city, plunged into a 10-year war over the abduction of the most beautiful woman in the world. This allure has sent adventurers and archaeologists in quest of the lost city, which is now widely believed to have existed.  But what of the heroes and the heartbroken, the women and the wanderers, who are said to have a played a part in the Trojan War? Why have they inspired so many retellings, from Homer to Shakespeare and Hollywood? Get closer to these captivating characters as you explore the breath-taking art that brings them to life

Venue: British Museum
23 Nov - ongoing

Cars: Accelerating The Modern World

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Cars: Accelerating the Modern World’ explores how the car as a driving force has accelerated the pace of change over the past century. The exhibition brings together 15 diverse cars to tell extraordinary stories about design and the car’s impact on the broader world. These cars include the first production car in existence; an autonomous flying car; a converted low-rider; and a 1950s concept car. Many of these cars have never been on show in the UK before, and their display will be uniquely juxtaposed with a diverse collection of products, fashion, graphics, photography and film, to draw connections to wider spheres of design and public life. We stand at a new turning point in mobility design -hope to understand our past blunders and achievements in order to better imagine how we want to move in the future.

Venue: Victoria and ALbert Museum

Starting in February 2020

27 Feb -28 Jun

David Hockney: Drawing from Life

 The first major exhibition devoted to David Hockney’s drawings in over twenty years, David Hockney: Drawing from Life, explores Hockney as a draughtsman from the 1950s to the present by focusing on depictions of himself and a small group of sitters close to him: his muse, Celia Birtwell; his mother, Laura Hockney; and friends, the curator, Gregory Evans, and master printer, Maurice Payne.
Venue: National Portrait Gallery